The bar at Victoria Burrow showcases shipping container decor

The bar at Victoria Burrow showcases shipping container decor

Victoria Burrow in Victoria, MN recently opened. The restaurant features street food and drinks served out of our shipping containers along with a wide range of fun activities — axe-throwing, mini-golf, bocce ball, virtual reality, an arcade, darts, bean-bag toss/corn hole, oversized Connect 4 and more!

Victoria Burrow bought two 20’ containers from Super Cubes - a red one-trip/”new” container and a blue used/wind- and water-tight container. They cut up the containers to use as decor throughout the restaurant.

Customers are able to experience our containers by first walking through a set of blue container doors and then are greeted by a container display in the entry way. Another cool attraction is the restaurant bar. The bar is physically made up of red container doors, side and portions of the container wall that are awning over the bar area.

If you ever want to experience seeing a container from the inside, here is your chance! You are able to sit inside one of the containers while enjoying your meal. You can hang out on the original container floor which also has an opening to the unique bar. The container area acts almost as a private seating section within the bigger space of the restaurant. From “inside” the container, customers can REALLY take in the physical container structure, as well see all other distinct aspects of the restaurant. If this seating area is taken up, no worries! Tucked back by the axe-throwing area, there is a second smaller seating section made out of container roofs.

Diners also can experience the containers up close when ordering and picking up their food. Similar to food trucks, all food items are ordered and picked up at concession windows that are made out of the containers.

We really enjoyed seeing the containers transformed — from first meeting with customer at the container yard to pick out their containers to viewing end product - Victoria Burrows restaurant!

To get more of a live effect, just click on all of our pictures!

Now, do you have big plans for containers? Call us at 877-374-5452 and we’ll help you with it!

Welcome to Victoria Burrow

Welcome to Victoria Burrow

The bar container invites people in

The bar container invites people in

A stand-alone 20’ container hotel room that can move around

A stand-alone 20’ container hotel room that can move around

When you are in the early stages of a container project, it is important to figure out the general scope of your project. You should have a rough idea of how many containers you think you will need, an idea of how you plan on using them and what general modifications you want. Are you looking to take a container and make a few tweaks to make it your own or are you planning a large, multi-container complex? Obviously, these are two ends of the spectrum, but having a good understanding of where you want to go will help in figuring out what you need to do.

 Please keep in mind the following:

  • If you are looking for just a few minor modifications to a container, you may or may not need to involve anyone else in your project. The real focus is getting the work done the way you want it.

  •  If you are looking for a home or retail space, things will get more complicated more quickly. You will need to look into local zoning issues, more detailed plans and involve more people in creating and following through with those plans.

  • Another thing to keep in mind is that the more you plan on taking away from a container (i.e. Removing full sides of the container, creating large windows, etc.) and/or stacking containers, the more complicated the project will be.

You have a rough idea of what you want, but there are still a ton of unanswered questions. You need experts to help you out in seeing what’s realistic for what you want to do. So, where do you turn next? Usually that is a 3-part answer. There are 3 things that you have to look at almost all at the same time. There are the containers themselves, the project’s design plan, and the feasibility of the project. There are many more issues to consider, but these questions help you figure out the rest of it. 

A recent customer stacked these 9 Super Cubes containers for a new home in St Louis

A recent customer stacked these 9 Super Cubes containers for a new home in St Louis

1.  The Containers

Containers come in three standard sizes and conditions. We also have some specialty containers that can also come in handy. Pricing will vary on the size and condition of the container as well as where you are located. Give us a call to get an idea of how much containers cost and how much they will cost to get to you.

To help with some of this, seeing the below specs on our standard container sizes and conditions of our containers: wind-and water-tight, cargo-worthy and one-trip. Also, viewing our container basics page is a great reference as well.

Max Gross: Weight of Full Container (Container Filled to Rim)    Tare: Weight of Container (Weight of Empty Container)    Net: Weight Capacity (Max Gross minus Tare)

Max Gross: Weight of Full Container (Container Filled to Rim)

Tare: Weight of Container (Weight of Empty Container)

Net: Weight Capacity (Max Gross minus Tare)

2. The Project Design

The most exciting part of the project is the design work. You have an image in your head of what you want to do. It is time to put that down on paper or on a screen to show everyone else your vision (what you want to do). Once you communicate it with someone else, your project will probably fall into one of three categories:

  •  Small, straightforward modifications, no structural elements. This is the most basic project. It’s just one container, you’re adding in a door and/or a window or two and that is about it. Overall, the container stays basically intact.

  • Smaller project, but some structural elements. Your project is still small, but has some part of it that requires a bit of structural work. It might be a large opening between two containers or large doors that reduce the structural integrity of the container.


  • Larger projects with structural elements. This would be any home, multi-container structure, or other projects that have considerable structural elements to it (i.e. stacking, larger cut-out sections, etc).

If you do need some structural help, we strongly recommend working with a structural engineer and/or an architect.  They will create plans that will help in the next few stages of your project. Those designs will be needed for any zoning and building code approvals as well as for pricing the cost of any desired modifications. These professionals will ensure that your design is safe. However if you are doing a smaller project with just a door or window, you can easily draw that up yourself.

A 50-container shrimp farm we helped with in Los Vegas, NV.

A 50-container shrimp farm we helped with in Los Vegas, NV.


Super Cubes does not have a design team. We can help with modifications, but we would either need a design that you draw up, one from your structural engineer or architect.

3.  Feasibility  

Where you are putting your project also is a big part of the equation. If you are building a house, does your project need to meet any building requirements by your city, county or state? Are you zoned for the type of project you have? What about the land itself? What preparations do you need to make to ensure you have the proper foundation for your project?  These are all critical questions that you will need to investigate before you get too far on your project. You may need to work with a variety of different people to get to all of these answers. Often you will need some of the design work done before getting too far into the feasibility work on your project.

Stayed tune for Part 2 in this series when we talk about modifications and other services needed for your project!

Today's blog is written by a Super Cubes' customer from Northeast Minnesota.  I was so excited to see pictures of the final product that I asked him to share how he made his beautiful container shed.  We talked about using Super Cubes kits for the doors and windows, but he made the right call to do it himself with much more beautiful options that he found himself. Check out the slideshow at the bottom of the post for more pictures.

We purchased a 20’ one-trip container from Super Cubes, with the idea to convert it into a shed for garden implements, seasonal storage (swapping bicycles for a snow-blower), lumber, and camping and rec gear. We initially sketched out some plans for a new shed and interviewed several contractors to build what we wanted. But it seemed none of them had a very good idea about how to build something functional yet interesting to look at, and then we hit upon the idea of converting a used shipping container. It turns out our house is sort of box-like, on several levels — much in the style of Frank Lloyd Wright — including a vertical board-and-batten exterior, so a container not only provided a bomb-proof, ready-made basic unit, but it had built in the vertical lines that could complement the house. All we had to do was get it to the property and start cutting in some windows and a door.

Super Cubes made it very easy for us to ‘pick out’ the right container even without making a visit by providing good photos of a container that Julia had picked out for us. That was very helpful and we avoided a special trip to the Twin Cities. Unfortunately, we live a couple of hours away from the Cities and had to make some special delivery plans. We hired a local auto transport company that has a flat-bed truck with a tilt bed and winch. They made the trip down to Super Cubes and picked up our pre-purchased container without a hitch.

The truck arrived on schedule, backed up a rather steep driveway, and maneuvered into place. The container was going to be set on an area of relatively flat grass at the top of the driveway and next to the house with a separation of about 8 feet. Before the truck arrived, I had laid out the right position with string and pegs. I wanted the container to be parallel with the house line, so measured out the rectangular ‘footprint’ of the container very carefully and marked it with string. Because the ground was not quite level, I also used the string lines and a level to show me where the ground had to be cut away slightly in order for the container to sit flat. 

The last thing to do was to make a foundation. Because the area drains well, I decided to use wooden blocks at each corner. The loads in the container would not be great with our contents, so I figured the container structure itself would be sound. Using 2” x 12” stock of treated lumber, I cut 12” x 12” squares, and then stacked them in the four corners, using the appropriate number in each corner to make the final foundation level.

The next trick was for the delivery driver to land the container on the pre-positioned wooden corner blocks. Working only with the pneumatic lift of the bed and the winch, he slowly slid the container exactly onto the wooden corner blocks, occasionally laying some lumber underneath to provide support while he made ‘adjustments’ in the position. In the end, the container had come to rest just where I wanted it! He was rightly proud of his ability to land the container within what seemed a millimeter of the planned position.

So then, just to make some modifications. We decided we wanted one ‘man-door’ in the side for easy day-to-day entry, plus a couple of windows. We also wanted a roof with a substantial eave to complement the house design, and we wanted to roof to have a gentle pitch to shed water (we collect rain water for gardens). We did hire a contractor to make the structural modifications, and I did the finish trim and painting. 

To make the roof, we designed a conventional wooden frame like you would use to support a deck — 2” x 6” joists on 18” centers, covered by plywood sheathing and then poly-rubber membrane. The frame was simply glued to the container using construction-grade cement in order to avoid penetrating the container with bolt-holes. The area is fairly protected by trees, so we don’t expect much wind load. A proper eave, fascia and drip edge were included, as well as venting in the eaves to allow air circulation into the roof structure. We did not insulate the roof because the shed will be un-heated.

Next came the door and windows. We got a great deal on some Anderson windows that were on sale — vinyl-clad, thermal pane, with screens and easy latching — so simply ordered the sizes we wanted. One facing the driveway, which you see most of the time, has a vertical orientation and we offset it to one side to give a little dynamic look. This was planned for the fixed end of the container. The other window was placed on a side at the end near the container doors to provide light and cross-ventilation. Then we ordered a door finished in fiberglass and primed for paint. 

All we had to do was get some frames made for the windows and doors, cut some openings, and weld in the frames. Easy, right? I marked out where we wanted the openings with painter’s tape. We hired a local fabricator to make steel frames out of 2” square stock and measured to fit the window and door opening specs. We had to use the 2” dimension because of the ‘corrugations’ in the container walls. With the finished frames in hand, the contractor marked the openings to be cut and did the job with a heavy-duty hand-held circular metal saw. Sparks were flying! Welding in the frames seemed to take no time at all. Once the steel frames were secure, I primed all the bare metal for later finish painting. Now it was just a matter of mounting the windows and door into their frames using screws and construction glue, and then finishing off with some trim to make them look good. The welded frames are barely visible and the welds are clean so it all looks great.

Once all of the ‘additions’ were done, it was just a matter of painting. I stripped off all of the container markings (except for the metal certification plaques, which look cool), sanded down rough spots, and primed a few knicks. I used a paint sprayer to cover the original container finish, after masking off all of the door hinges and shackles, rubber seals, vents, and the new door and windows. Because I was going to paint to match the house, I decided on a latex final coat. This meant I had to lay down a coat of primer first so the latex would adhere to the container finish. So altogether, I sprayed down three coats — a primer base, and two finish coats. Then all the eaves, fascia, brick mold, and window/door trim by brush. Whew.

The final step was to landscape around the container and enjoy! My wife is an amazing gardener, creating natural landscapes and mini-environments with native plants, so we put in a combination of perennial beds and landscaping mulch to set off the container and also provide some paths for high-traffic areas. It looks really nice!

Viola! Not quite instant with all of these steps over some period of time and the passage of several seasons, but we have a custom shed that has all the features we wanted, it has relieved space in the garage, and it looks like it belongs with the house. 

Thank you Super Cubes!