Do you need more space on your farm for anything from outbuildings, processing shops for poultry, game or even meat smoking, additional equipment storage, hay storage and more?  Maybe a container is what you need.  Here is a great article showing how they have adapted containers to be everything from mobile tack rooms for the horse boarders to a large barn made from several containers

It raises a good point, containers are fantastic tools to have on a farm.  They are insect and rodent proof.  They are easy to modify and easy to move.  They really have almost no maintenance.  What more could you ask for?

Posted
AuthorSuper Cubes LLC

OK, you’re thinking storage. Over easy, hold the hassles. What are the options?

There’s that ready-to-assemble shed you saw at Home Depot … or that pole barn kit from something-dot-com … and those portable storage units provided by the big national moving and storage company occasionally trucked on and off neighbors’ driveways.

But wait—what about a steel container? If it’s not on your list, maybe it should be. Yeah, we admit we’re biased. But it’s a fact that steel containers have many advantages compared to other storage solutions.

Storage Solution

Pros

             Cons

Sheds

  • Prefab kits available locally or online

  • Buy with installation option or DIY

  • Usually easy delivery

  • Height and width options

  • You can pick options to fit your needs – windows, color, shelving, etc.

  • DIY may take many weekends

  • Site prep (crushed stone bed or cement slab)

  • Many not very sturdy (cheap metal, waferboard, or plastic)

  • Premium cost for durability

  • Upkeep/lifespan issues

  • Often building code issues (may need building permit)

  • Not moveable

Pole Barns

  • DIY kits available locally or online

  • Can customize design & size

  • Versatile to fit your exact needs

  • Building costs add up fast

  • Long lead time

  • Site prep (may need cement slab)

  • May be overkill for your needs

  • Need building permit

  • Not moveable

National branded portable storage units

  • Easy delivery

  • Ready to store in a warehouse

  • Rent only (a few suppliers sell, but prices match containers)

  • Not highly sturdy or durable (plywood walls, translucent plastic tops tacked on top)

  • Limited sizes (biggest is 16’ x 8’, smaller than the smallest steel container)

  • Designed to store in a warehouse, not outside

Steel Containers

  • Come ready to use

  • Relatively cheap

  • Delivered exactly where you want it

  • No building permit issues

  • Many customization options (paint, doors, windows, vents, lights, shelving, etc.)

  • Indestructible (14-gauge corrugated weatherizing steel)

  • Highly secure

  • Hardwood floors with steel support beams

  • Big enough for cars, boats, contents of 3-bedroom house

  • Moveable

  • Use for storage or for housing

  • Fixed height and width (8’ wide x 20’ or 40’ long)

  • Costs higher in some locations (usually due to delivery more than anything else)

  • Some zoning issues

You know your storage situation best, but hopefully this table can help if you were on the fence about which style to go with.  If you want more information on containers, please visit the rest of our site or call us at 877-374-5452.

One-trip container next to a workshop

One-trip container next to a workshop

container-art_journey_01

container-art_journey_01

From datacenters to farm storage to storm cellars

Whether it's food and hunting supplies in a little retreat in the woods or pigs in a farm shelter, there are some interesting things showing up in steel shipping containers. Here are a few more examples of how people are using their containers:

  • Microsoft's Cloud Computer Data Center

  • Cabin

  • Modern root cellar; the container is buried in a hill and holds veggies and a plow.

  • 8 minis (yes 8 cars, sans wheels, in a 40' container)

  • Burn building used by a fire department to train firefighters.

  • Car port; two shipping containers set up for storage with a roof between the two. Talk about storage space!

  • Warehouse space.

  • Sides of a barn; containers provide lockable storage areas.

  • Large barn.

Before you purchase your own steel shipping container to use for your own creative purposes, be sure to check your local codes. A few communities have special requirements if the containers are going to be buried, hold food, or house humans.

Everyone has storage problems. Shipping containers probably won't help with all those shoes cluttering your closets. You can't store you baby sister until she grows up either. But you could store you old car until it's old enough to qualify as a collectible instead of junk.

What's in your storage container?

What would you like to see in your container?

Do you think Santa has 40' steel containers on each continent to keep toys safe for Christmas?